African Americans

Gilbert, D. J., Harvey, A. R., & Belgrave, F. Z. (2009). Advancing the Africentric paradigm shift discourse: Building toward evidence-based Africentric interventions in social work practice with African Americans. Social Work, 54(3), 243–252.   

Mikle, K. S. (2016). African American couples: Socio-cultural factors impacting marriage trends, reflections on marriageability, and a systematic review of culturally grounded couple and marriage relationship intervention (Doctoral dissertation). University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas.  

Williams, J., Simon, C., & Bell, A. (2015). Missing the mark: The image of the social work profession in an African-American community. Journal of Ethnic and Cultural Diversity in Social Work24(1), 56–70.

Geary, A. M. (2014). Antiblack racism and the AIDS epidemic: State intimacies. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Expanded References/Abstracts

Gilbert, D. J., Harvey, A. R., & Belgrave, F. Z. (2009). Advancing the Africentric paradigm shift discourse: Building toward evidence-based Africentric interventions in social work practice with African Americans. Social Work, 54(3), 243–252. PDF Available here

Abstract: For over a decade, a number of social work scholars have advocated for an Africentric paradigm shift in social work practice with African Americans; yet the paradigm shift has been slow in coming with respect to infusing Africentric theory and interventions into social work practice, education, and research. Interventions that infuse Africentric values (such as interdependence, collectivism, transformation, and spirituality) have been shown to create significant change across a number of areas important to social work practice with African Americans. However, a barrier to the full integration of Africentric models into social work practice is that Africentric programs lack cohesive documentation and replication and, thus, have limited potential to be established as evidence-based practices. The authors present an overview of various Africentric interventions, including their components and methods of evaluation, with the aim of establishing guideposts or next steps in developing a discourse on Africentric interventions that are promising best practices or are emerging as evidence-based practices. The authors conclude with implications for social work practice, education, and research and a call for Africentric scholars to engage in increased discussion, dissemination of manualized treatments, and collaborative research to build the evidence-based Africentric knowledge base and foster replication of studies.

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Mikle, K. S. (2016). African American couples: Socio-cultural factors impacting marriage trends, reflections on marriageability, and a systematic review of culturally grounded couple and marriage relationship intervention (Doctoral dissertation). University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas. Dissertation available here.  

Abstract: Research shows that African American couples persevere through marital discord by relying on protective factors unique to their culture, including a strong sense of community, supportive family, kinship, and ideals focused around spirituality and culture. Yet few studies have systematically analyzed the extent to which current relationship intervention programs integrate cultural components unique to African Americans to effectively reduce relationship discord for African American couples. This systematic review of the literature examines the socio-cultural factors impacting African American relationships, exploring African American women’s reflections about marriageability, and evaluating the cultural components of interventions to reduce African American relationship discord. It contributes to a virtually untouched research area by delineating the decades-long socio-cultural-historical factors impacting African American marriages, uncovering the insights of African American women, and systematically examining how Africentric and other culturally-grounded components foster effective couples interventions for African American couples.

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Williams, J., Simon, C., & Bell, A. (2015). Missing the mark: The image of the social work profession in an African-American community. Journal of Ethnic and Cultural Diversity in Social Work24(1), 56–70.

Abstract: This exploratory study used a project-developed questionnaire to examine the perceptions of members of an African-American community (N = 102) regarding the social work profession and its commitment to issues pertinent to African-Americans. The results suggested that while the African-American respondents felt that social workers could be a source of help, a considerable amount of the respondents reported that they did not see social workers as being helpful or sensitive to the needs of African-Americans. The results of this study have implications for social work practitioners and educators.
 
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Geary, A. M. (2014). Antiblack racism and the AIDS epidemic: State intimacies. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

Abstract: This book provides evidence helpful to practice with Black Americans by highlighting how structural violence plays a role in the AIDS outcomes of Black Americans. Specifically, it examines the role of antiblack state violence in producing the social vulnerability and susceptibility to HIV infection. The prevalence and incidence rates of HIV for Black Americans are dramatically greater than for any other racial-ethnic groups in the United States. In dominant social and scientific discourses, HIV infection has been understood as an index of risk behaviors (e.g., drug use and risky sex) and has incorporated aspects of cultural identity. Yet the author challenges this popular perception and argues that not behaviors or identities can alone describe the AIDS epidemic among Black Americans. Rather, he demonstrates how structural racism has made Black Americans vulnerable to HIV. Social inequality in the United States, which is a direct consequence of antiblack racism, produces political, economic, and environmental conditions that make human bodies susceptible to this epidemic. According to the author, “ill health and embodied vulnerability that structure HIV risks for black Americans are produced through racist relations of domination and violence in the United States, primarily black ghettoization and mass incarceration” (p. 24).

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