Latinos

Barrio, C., & Yamada, A. M. (2010). Culturally based intervention development: The case of Latino families dealing with schizophrenia. Research on Social Work Practice20(5), 483–492.

Niebler, M., Documét, P. I., Chaves-Gnecco, D., & Guadamuz, T. E. (2016). Birth experiences of immigrant Latina women in a new growth community. Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities, 3(3), 466–472.

Robles, E. H. (2015). Effectiveness of culturally adapted substance use interventions for Latino adolescents: A systematic review and meta-analysis (Doctoral dissertation).  

Domenech Rodríguez, M. M., Baumann, A. A., & Schwartz, A. L. (2011). Cultural adaptation of an evidence based intervention: From theory to practice in a Latino/a community context. American Journal of Community Psychology, 47(1–2), 170–186.

Duarté‐Vélez, Y., Bernal, G., & Bonilla, K. (2010). Culturally adapted cognitive‐behavior therapy: Integrating sexual, spiritual, and family identities in an evidence‐based treatment of a depressed Latino adolescent. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 66, 895–906.

Kulis, S., Marsiglia, F. F., Elek, E., Dustman, P., Wagstaff, D. A., & Hecht, M. L. (2005). Mexican/Mexican American adolescents and keepin'it REAL: An evidence-based substance use prevention program. Children & Schools, 27(3), 133–145.

Perez, L. G., Arredondo, E. M., Elder, J. P., Barquera, S., Nagle, B., & Holub, C. K. (2013). Evidence-based obesity treatment interventions for Latino adults in the US: A systematic review. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 44, 550–560.

Woodruff, S. I., Talavera, G. A., & Elder, J. P. (2002). Evaluation of a culturally appropriate smoking cessation intervention for Latinos. Tobacco Control, 11(4), 361–367.

Villarruel, A. M., Jemmott, L. S., & Jemmott, J. B. (2005). Designing a culturally based intervention to reduce HIV sexual risk for Latino adolescents. Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, 16(2), 23–31.

Weisman, A. (2005). Integrating culturally based approaches with existing interventions for Hispanic/Latino families coping with schizophrenia. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 42(2), 178–197. doi:10.1037/0033-3204.42.2.178

Carpentier, F. R. D., Mauricio, A. M., Gonzales, N. A., Millsap, R. E., Meza, C. M., Dumka, L. E., ... & Genalo, M. T. (2007). Engaging Mexican origin families in a school-based preventive intervention. The Journal of Primary Prevention, 28, 521–546.

Martinez, C. R., Jr., & Eddy, J. M. (2005). Effects of culturally adapted parent management training on Latino youth behavioral health outcomes. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 73, 841–851. doi:10.1037/0022-006X.73.5.841

Lescano, C. M., Brown, L. K., Raffaelli, M., & Lima, L. A. (2009). Cultural factors and family-based HIV prevention intervention for Latino youths. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 34, 1041–1052.

Field, C. A., Cabriales, J. A., Woolard, R. H., Tyroch, A. H., Caetano, R., & Castro, Y. (2015). Cultural adaptation of a brief motivational intervention for heavy drinking among Hispanics in a medical setting. BMC Public Health, 15(1), 724.

Guerrero, E. G., Marsh, J. C., Khachikian, T., Amaro, H., & Vega, W. A. (2013). Disparities in Latino substance use, service use, and treatment: implications for culturally and evidence-based interventions under health care reform. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 133, 805–813.

Barkin, S. L., Gesell, S. B., Po’e, E. K., Escarfuller, J., & Tempesti, T. (2012). Culturally tailored, family-centered, behavioral obesity intervention for Latino-American preschool-aged children. Pediatrics, 130(3), 445–456.

D'angelo, E. J., Llerena-Quinn, R., Shapiro, R., Colon, F., Rodriguez, P., Gallagher, K., & Beardslee, W. R. (2009). Adaptation of the preventive intervention program for depression for use with predominantly low‐income Latino families. Family Process, 48(2), 269–291.

 

Expanded References/Abstracts

Barrio, C., & Yamada, A. M. (2010). Culturally based intervention development: The case of Latino families dealing with schizophrenia. Research on Social Work Practice20, 483–492.

Abstract: This article describes the process of developing a culturally based family intervention for Spanish-speaking Latino families with a relative diagnosed with schizophrenia. Method: Our iterative intervention development process was guided by a cultural exchange framework and based on findings from an ethnographic study. We piloted this multifamily group 16-session intervention with 59 Latino families in a randomized control trial. Data were collected on family- and client-level outcomes, and poststudy focus groups were conducted with intervention participants. Results: Preliminary evidence indicates that the intervention is effective by increasing illness knowledge and reducing family burden. Conclusions: This work can provide a model for how to integrate cultural factors into psychosocial services and enhance interventions in real-world settings for culturally diverse populations.

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Niebler, M., Documét, P. I., Chaves-Gnecco, D., & Guadamuz, T. E. (2016). Birth experiences of immigrant Latina women in a new growth community. Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities, 3, 466–472.

Abstract: A woman’s birth experience can affect the physical and mental well-being of mothers long after the birth of a child. Little is known about the experiences of Latina women in areas with small, yet growing Latino populations. To understand Latinas perceptions of their childbirth experience and to see how insurance status affects that experience, we conducted in-depth, semistructured interviews with a nonproportional quota sampling of 10 Latina women, five with and five without health insurance. Most women reported a positive global experience; the birth of a healthy child was the most important factor influencing birth experiences for all of them. Locus of control and support from medical providers and loved ones also shaped experiences. Uninsured women reported lower levels of perceived control and support, which did affect their birthing experience. These differences could be influenced by social status and position. Medical provider, hospital, and policy recommendations are made that could lead to improvements in uninsured Latinas’ childbirth experiences.

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Robles, E. H. (2015). Effectiveness of culturally adapted substance use interventions for Latino adolescents: A systematic review and meta-analysis (Doctoral dissertation). Available here.

Abstract: This systematic review and a meta-analysis examined the characteristics and effects of culturally adapted substance use interventions with Latino adolescents on substance use outcomes. The research question guiding this study was: What are the effects of culturally adapted interventions on substance use outcomes with Latino adolescents? By using meta-analysis, the study analyzed 10 outcomes studies on substance use in a community organization (n = 6) or school setting (n = 4). The majority of the interventions were short term (less than 16 weeks) and used CBT or BSFT methods (50%). Results indicate that significant effects of moderate magnitude on substance use outcomes at posttest and an overall positive moderate effect at follow-up. While culturally adapted substance use interventions demonstrated positive impacts on substance use overall, there was significant variability across studies. Therefore, the findings emphasize the need for rigorously conducted studies to better discern the benefits of utilizing culturally adapted interventions for reducing substance use among Hispanic adolescents. 

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Domenech Rodríguez, M. M., Baumann, A. A., & Schwartz, A. L. (2011). Cultural adaptation of an evidence based intervention: From theory to practice in a Latino/a community context. American journal of community psychology, 47(1–2), 170–186.

The cultural tailoring of interventions to reach underserved groups has moved from descriptive and proscriptive models to their application with existing evidence based treatments. To date few published examples illustrate the process of cultural adaptation. The current paper documents the adaptation of an evidence based parent training intervention, Parent Management Training—Oregon Model (PMTO™), for Spanish-speaking Latino parents using both process (Domenech Rodríguez and Wieling in Voices of Color: First-Person Accounts of Ethnic Minority Therapists, SAGE, Thousand Oaks, CA, 2004) and content (Bernal et al. in J Abnorm Child Psychol 23:67–82, 1995) models. The adaptation took place in stages: A pilot study to ensure feasibility, focus groups to establish appropriate format and goals, and a test of the intervention. Throughout the process the treatment manual was treated as a living document. Changes were applied and documented as the team developed improvements for the adaptation. The present discussion details both process adaptations, (e.g., engaging the treatment developer, community leaders, and parents, and decentering the manual), and content adaptations, (e.g., shaping the appropriateness of language, persons, metaphors, concepts, contexts, methods, and goals). The current research provides support for the idea that cultural adaptations can improve service delivery to diverse groups and can be conducted systematically with documentation for replication purposes. Suggestions for improving the empirical measurement and documentation of the adaptation process are included.

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Duarté‐Vélez, Y., Bernal, G., & Bonilla, K. (2010). Culturally adapted cognitive‐behavior therapy: Integrating sexual, spiritual, and family identities in an evidence‐based treatment of a depressed Latino adolescent. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 66, 895–906.

The article described and illustrated how a culturally adapted cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) can maintain fidelity to a treatment protocol while allowing for considerable flexibility to address a patient’s values, preferences, and context. A manual-based CBT was used with a gay Latino adolescent regarding his sexual identity, family values, and spiritual ideas. The adolescent suffered from a major depression disorder and identified himself as gay and Christian within a conservative and machista Puerto Rican family. CBT promoted personal acceptance and active questioning of homophobic thoughts in a climate of family respect. CBT enabled identity formation and integration, central to the development of a sexual identity for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth, with remission of the patient’s depression and better family outcomes.

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Kulis, S., Marsiglia, F. F., Elek, E., Dustman, P., Wagstaff, D. A., & Hecht, M. L. (2005). Mexican/Mexican American adolescents and keepin'it REAL: An evidence-based substance use prevention program. Children & Schools, 27(3), 133–145.

A randomized trial tested the efficacy of three curriculum versions teaching drug resistance strategies, one modeled on Mexican American culture; another modeled on European American and African American culture; and a multicultural version. Self-report data at baseline and 14 months postintervention were obtained from 3,402 Mexican heritage students in 35 Arizona middle schools, including 11 control sites. Tests for intervention effects used simultaneous regression models, multiple imputation of missing data, and adjustments for random effects. Compared with controls, students in the Latino version reported less overall substance use and marijuana use, stronger intentions to refuse substances, greater confidence they could do so, and lower estimates of substance-using peers. Students in the multicultural version reported less alcohol, marijuana, and overall substance use. Although program effects were confined to the Latino and multicultural versions, tests of their relative efficacy compared with the non-Latino version found no significant differences. Implications for evidence-based practice and prevention program designs are discussed, including the role of school social workers in culturally grounded prevention.

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Perez, L. G., Arredondo, E. M., Elder, J. P., Barquera, S., Nagle, B., & Holub, C. K. (2013). Evidence-based obesity treatment interventions for Latino adults in the US: A systematic review. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 44, 550–560.

Latinos have one of the highest prevalences of obesity in the U.S. Efforts to address U.S. Latino health have expanded to include obesity prevention and treatment initiatives. The objectives of this review were to (1) conduct a systematic review of obesity-related treatment interventions targeting U.S. Latino adults and (2) develop evidence-based recommendations to inform culturally relevant strategies for obesity treatment targeting U.S. Latino adults. Evidence acquisition: Obesity treatment interventions, published between 1990 and 2010, were identifıed through a systematic search of electronic databases conducted between January 2010 and December 2011. Details of the screening process and selection/exclusion criteria are reported in the Guide to Obesity Prevention in Latin America and the U.S. (GOL) parent study. Evidence synthesis: Of the 325 studies identifıed in the GOL parent study, 105 met the inclusion criteria, and 22 involved obesity treatment interventions for Latinos and were included in the present review. The 22 studies were evaluated (between January 2010 and December 2011) for strength of study design and execution; effect sizes were also estimated for treatment effects on obesity-related outcomes. Interventions for physical activity or diet behavioral changes with strong or suffıcient evidence included (1) community-based, culturally relevant, RCTs, and nonrandomized controlled trials; (2) church-based interventions; and (3) promotora-led interventions. Conclusions: Most interventions targeted physical activity and/or diet behavioral modifıcation in Latinas and were led by bicultural/bilingual professionals. Potential key intervention settings include community clinics/centers and churches. Although there was limited literature on obesity treatment interventions for U.S. Latinos, the review fındings provide valuable insight to researchers and practitioners involved in obesity treatment for U.S. Latino adults.

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Woodruff, S. I., Talavera, G. A., & Elder, J. P. (2002). Evaluation of a culturally appropriate smoking cessation intervention for Latinos. Tobacco Control, 11, 361–367.

Background: Many believe that smoking cessation programmes for Latinos should be tailored to the values and beliefs of the culture. However, randomised studies of culturally appropriate smoking cessation interventions with Latinos are rare. Methods: Latino smokers (n=313) were randomised to an intervention condition or a comparison group. The intervention was a three month programme based on social cognitive constructs and delivered in the smoker’s home by trained lay health advisors, or promotores. Comparison group participants were referred to the California Smoker’s Helpline in Spanish. Predictors of abstinence among all participants also were examined. Results: About one week postintervention, validated (carbon monoxide) past week abstinence rates were more than twice as high in the intervention group (20.5%) than in the comparison (8.7%) (p ≤ 0.005). The pattern of results held for self reported abstinence, and after recoding dropouts to non-abstinence. The primary predictor of abstinence was number of cigarettes smoked per day at baseline, a common measure of addiction. Conclusions: The culturally appropriate intervention facilitated abstinence in Latino smokers, at least in the short term. Strengths and weaknesses of the study are discussed.

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Villarruel, A. M., Jemmott, L. S., & Jemmott, J. B. (2005). Designing a culturally based intervention to reduce HIV sexual risk for Latino adolescents. Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, 16(2), 23–31.

There is a pressing need to develop effective interventions to prevent sexually transmitted HIV infection among Latino adolescents. Although there have been few models to direct the design of culturally effective interventions, the processes of recognizing the influence of specific cultural and contextual variables, building on “what works,” and integrating community perspectives are important elements. These processes were used in the development of a Latino culturally based curriculum designed to reduce the risk of sexually transmitted HIV among Latino youth. Specific examples are provided to illustrate how these processes were used and how the curriculum evolved.

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Weisman, A. (2005). Integrating culturally based approaches with existing interventions for Hispanic/Latino families coping with schizophrenia. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 42(2), 178–197. doi:10.1037/0033-3204.42.2.178

Evidence suggests that schizophrenia is highly responsive to the sociocultural and emotional atmosphere of the family. Therapies have shown an improvement in schizophrenia symptoms following family-oriented interventions. However, most programs are developed and offered in English only, and few are culturally informed. Existing programs may fail to meet the needs of minorities, particularly Hispanics/Latinos, the largest minority group in the United States. In this article, a broad literature is reviewed, which strongly supports the integration of culturally based treatment approaches with existing psychoeducational family-focused interventions to enhance treatment programs for Hispanic/Latino patients and families coping with schizophrenia. On the basis of this conceptual integration, an intervention titled "culturally informed therapy for schizophrenia" is described.

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Carpentier, F. R. D., Mauricio, A. M., Gonzales, N. A., Millsap, R. E., Meza, C. M., Dumka, L. E., ... & Genalo, M. T. (2007). Engaging Mexican origin families in a school-based preventive intervention. The Journal of Primary Prevention, 28, 521–546.

This study describes a culturally sensitive approach to engage Mexican origin families in a school-based, family-focused preventive intervention trial. The approach was evaluated via assessing study enrollment and intervention program participation, as well as examining predictors of engagement at each stage. Incorporating traditional cultural values into all aspects of engagement resulted in participation rates higher than reported rates of minority-focused trials not emphasizing cultural sensitivity. Family preferred language (English or Spanish) or acculturation status predicted engagement at all levels, with less acculturated families participating at higher rates. Spanish-language families with less acculturated adolescents participated at higher rates than Spanish-language families with more acculturated adolescents. Other findings included two-way interactions between family language and the target child’s familism values, family single- vs. dual-parent status, and number of hours the primary parent worked in predicting intervention participation. Editors’ Strategic Implications: The authors present a promising approach—which requires replication—to engaging and retaining Mexican American families in a school-based prevention program. The research also highlights the importance of considering acculturation status when implementing and studying culturally tailored aspects of prevention models.

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Martinez, C. R., Jr., & Eddy, J. M. (2005). Effects of culturally adapted parent management training on Latino youth behavioral health outcomes. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 73, 841–851. doi:10.1037/0022-006X.73.5.841

A randomized experimental test of the implementation feasibility and the efficacy of a culturally adapted Parent Management Training intervention was conducted with a sample of 73 Spanish-speaking Latino parents with middle-school-aged youth at risk for problem behaviors. Intervention feasibility was evaluated through weekly parent satisfaction ratings, intervention participation and attendance, and overall program satisfaction. Intervention effects were evaluated by examining changes in parenting and youth adjustment for the intervention and control groups between baseline and intervention termination approximately 5 months later. Findings provided strong evidence for the feasibility of delivering the intervention in a larger community context. The intervention produced benefits in both parenting outcomes (i.e., general parenting, skill encouragement, overall effective parenting) and youth outcomes (i.e., aggression, externalizing, likelihood of smoking and use of alcohol, marijuana, and other drugs). Differential effects of the intervention were based on youth nativity status.

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Lescano, C. M., Brown, L. K., Raffaelli, M., & Lima, L. A. (2009). Cultural factors and family-based HIV prevention intervention for Latino youth. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 34, 1041–1052.

Latino youths are the fastest growing ethnic group in the United States and are at considerable risk for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), given that they have an earlier onset of sexual activity and use condoms less consistently than European American adolescents. Theorists and scholars have emphasized the importance of taking culture into account in sexuality interventions with Latino adolescents, yet few culturally tailored interventions have been developed for this population. Given the emphasis on familismo and collectivism among Latinos, family-based programs are likely to be well received and could contribute to long-term maintenance of adolescent safety. In this synthesis of the relevant literature, cultural factors that have been identified as relevant to Latino sexuality are reviewed and implications for family-based intervention with Latinos are addressed.

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Field, C. A., Cabriales, J. A., Woolard, R. H., Tyroch, A. H., Caetano, R., & Castro, Y. (2015). Cultural adaptation of a brief motivational intervention for heavy drinking among Hispanics in a medical setting. BMC Public Health, 15, 724.

Background. Hispanics, particularly men of Mexican origin, are more likely to engage in heavy drinking and experience alcohol-related problems, but less likely to obtain treatment for alcohol problems than non-Hispanic men. Our previous research indicates that heavy-drinking Hispanics who received a brief motivational intervention (BMI) were significantly more likely than Hispanics receiving standard care to reduce subsequent alcohol use. Among Hispanics who drink heavily the BMI effectively reduced alcohol use but did not impact alcohol-related problems or treatment utilization. We hypothesized that an adapted BMI that integrates cultural values and addresses acculturative stress among Hispanics would be more effective. Methods/Design. We describe here the protocol for the design and implementation of a randomized (approximately 300 patients per condition) controlled trial evaluating the comparative effectiveness of a culturally adapted (CA) BMI in contrast to a non-adapted BMI (NA-BMI) in a community hospital setting among men of Mexican origin. Study participants will include men who were hospitalized due to an alcohol related injury or screened positive for heavy drinking. By accounting for risk and protective factors of heavy drinking among Hispanics, we hypothesize that CA-BMI will significantly decrease alcohol use and alcohol problems, and increase help-seeking and treatment utilization. Discussion. This is likely the first study to directly address alcohol related health disparities among non-treatment seeking men of Mexican origin by comparing the benefits of a CA-BMI to a NA-BMI. This study stands to not only inform interventions used in medical settings to reduce alcohol-related health disparities, but may also help reduce the public health burden of heavy alcohol use in the United States.

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Guerrero, E. G., Marsh, J. C., Khachikian, T., Amaro, H., & Vega, W. A. (2013). Disparities in Latino substance use, service use, and treatment: implications for culturally and evidence-based interventions under health care reform. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 133, 805–813.

Background The goal of this systematic literature review was to enhance understanding of substance use, service use, and treatment among Latino subgroups to improve access to care and treatment outcomes in an era of health care reform. Method The authors used 13 electronic databases and manually searched the literature from January 1, 1978, to May 30, 2013. One hundred (69%) of 145 primary research articles met the inclusion criteria. Two blinded, independent reviewers scored each article. Consensus discussions and a content expert reconciled discrepancies. Results Current rates of alcohol and substance abuse among Latinos are comparable to or surpass other U.S. ethnic groups. Disparities in access and quality of care are evident between Latinos and other ethnic groups. As a heterogeneous group, Latinos vary by geographic region in terms of substance of choice and their cultural identity takes precedence over general ethnic identity as a likely determinant of substance abuse behaviors. There is growing research interest in systems influencing treatment access and adherence among racial/ethnic and gender minority groups. However, studies on Latinos’ service use and immediate treatment outcomes have been both limited in number and inconsistent in findings. Conclusions This review identified human capital, quality of care, and access to culturally responsive care as key strategies to eliminate disparities in health and treatment quality. Implications are discussed, including the need for effectiveness studies on Latinos served by systems of care that, under health care reform, are seeking to maximize resources, improve outcomes, and reduce variation in quality of care.

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Barkin, S. L., Gesell, S. B., Po’e, E. K., Escarfuller, J., & Tempesti, T. (2012). Culturally tailored, family-centered, behavioral obesity intervention for Latino-American preschool-aged children. Pediatrics, 130, 445–456.

OBJECTIVE: To test the effect of a culturally tailored, family-centered, short-term behavioral intervention on BMI in Latino-American preschool-aged children. METHOD: In a randomized controlled trial, 54 parent–child dyads were allocated to the intervention and 52 dyads were allocated to an alternative school-readiness program as the control condition. Parent–child dyads were eligible if the parent self-defined Latino, was at least 18 years old, had a 2- to 6-year-old child not currently enrolled in another healthy lifestyle program, had a valid telephone number, and planned on remaining in the city for the next 6 months. The Salud Con La Familia (Health with the Family) program consisted of 12 weekly 90-minute skills-building sessions designed to improve family nutritional habits and increase physical activity. Both programs were conducted in a community recreation center serving an urban neighborhood of mostly Spanish-speaking residents. RESULTS:Forty-two percent of participating preschool-aged children were overweight or obese. Controlling for child age, gender, and baseline BMI, the effect of the treatment condition on postintervention absolute BMI was B=–0.59 (P<.001). The intervention effect seemed to be strongest for obese children. CONCLUSIONS: A skills-building, culturally tailored intervention involving parent–child dyads changed short-term early growth patterns in these Latino-American preschool-aged children. Examining long-term effects would be a prudent next step.

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D'angelo, E. J., Llerena-Quinn, R., Shapiro, R., Colon, F., Rodriguez, P., Gallagher, K., & Beardslee, W. R. (2009). Adaptation of the preventive intervention program for depression for use with predominantly low‐income Latino families. Family Process, 48(2), 269–291.

This article describes the process for and safety/feasibility of adapting the Beardslee Preventive Intervention Program for Depression for use with predominantly low income, Latino families. Using a Stage I model for protocol development, the adaptation involved literature review, focus groups, pilot testing of the adapted manual, and open trial of the adapted intervention with nine families experiencing maternal depression. Adaptations included conducting the intervention in either Spanish or English, expanding the intervention to include the contextual experience of Latino families in the United States with special attention to cultural metaphors, and using a strength-based, family-centered approach. The families completed preintervention measures for maternal depression, child behavioral difficulties, global functioning, life stresses, and an interview that included questions about acculturative stressors, resiliency, and family awareness of parental depression. The postintervention interview focused on satisfaction, distress, benefits of the adapted intervention, and therapeutic alliance. The results revealed that the adaptation was nonstressful, perceived as helpful by family members, had effects that seem to be similar to the original intervention, and the preventionists could maintain fidelity to the revised manual. The therapeutic alliance with the preventionists was experienced as quite positive by the mothers. A case example illustrates how the intervention was adapted.

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