Muslims and Islam

Aziz, S. F., & Burress, C. (2016). Books focused on Muslims and Islam in the United States (1970–2015). (Bibliography).

Walpole, S. C., McMillan, D., House, A., Cottrell, D., & Mir, G. (2013). Interventions for treating depression in Muslim patients: A systematic review. Journal of Affective Disorders, 145(1), 11–20.

Expanded References/Abstracts

Aziz, S. F., & Burress, C. (2016). Books focused on Muslims and Islam in the United States (1970–2015) (Bibliography). Available here

Abstract: For a variety of reasons, Muslims in America are in the public spotlight. As a result, the demand for information and analysis on Muslims and Islam in the United States has risen. In an effort to provide a resource for academics, advocates, journalists, and others, we created this bibliography composed of more than 230 books published between 1970 and 2015 focused on Muslims and Islam in the United States. We did not include books that focus primarily on Islam and/or Muslims outside the United States. The bibliography is categorized by subject matter and chronologically, with the most recent publications first. The categories include anthropology, biography, health, history, law, political science, reference, and sociology. The authors invite additions of relevant books not included in this list by contacting them through the address provided on the website.

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Walpole, S. C., McMillan, D., House, A., Cottrell, D., & Mir, G. (2013). Interventions for treating depression in Muslim patients: A systematic review. Journal of Affective Disorders, 145(1), 11–20.

Background Religious belief is an important determinant of mental health, depression is the mental illness responsible for the largest disease burden globally, and Islam is the fastest growing world religion. Here we systematically review the literature on the engagement of Muslim patients in the treatment of depression. Method A search of electronic databases, including nontraditional sources, was conducted, and content experts were contacted to identify qualitative studies, quantitative studies, and opinion pieces. A standardized data extraction pro forma and thematic analysis were applied to included studies.
Results Twenty-five studies met the inclusion criteria. Muslims hold many beliefs about depression relevant to its treatment. Advice about how to identify and respond to such beliefs was contradictory and rarely based on research evidence. The literature is generally of poor quality and rarely distinguishes between religion and culture.
Limitations Many studies do not distinguish between beliefs and values that are religious and those that are cultural. The majority of papers identified are English language, suggesting that literature from predominantly Muslim countries is underrepresented, despite our strategy of searching for literature from all relevant countries.
Conclusion Much of the evidence identified by this review is methodologically weak or includes assertions made without qualification. This evidence provides important perspectives but should be interpreted with caution. High-quality research is needed to improve our understanding of the treatment of depression in Muslim clients, to determine how existing therapies can be modified to meet the needs of Muslim clients, and to evaluate the effectiveness of such modified therapies.

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