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About Us

Founded in 1952, the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) is the national association representing social work education in the United States. Its members include over 750 accredited baccalaureate and master’s degree social work programs, as well as individual social work educators, practitioners, and agencies dedicated to advancing quality social work education. Through its many initiatives, activities, and centers, CSWE supports quality social work education and provides opportunities for leadership and professional development, so that social workers play a central role in achieving the profession’s goals of social and economic justice. CSWE’s Commission on Accreditation is recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation as the sole accrediting agency for social work education in the United States and its territories.


What's New

We have discussed a variety of topics affecting the social work profession during the COVID-19 pandemic. This is meaningful and enriching – but exhausting - work. It’s no surprise that self-care remains one of the most popular conversations among social workers across the globe.  

Resources for Disclosure Requirements
Highlighting ASWB resources to help social work programs comply with licensure disclosure regulations
As of July 1, 2020, institutions receiving federal financial aid are required to disclose information about degree programs and students’ eligibility for professional licensure. ASWB has resources to help CSWE members comply with these regulations. 
​CSWE joined with the American Council on Education and dozens of education associations in advocating for increased funding for colleges from congressional leaders. As students, faculty, and colleges prepare for a new semester during the coronavirus pandemic, CSWE urged for financial support from lawmakers in two letters on Aug. 6, 2020.
COVID-19 has revealed racial disparities that illuminate institutional and systemic racism. It is necessary for us to consider how our programs, approaches, and initiatives address the ways the public health pandemic, which is unabating, and the centuries-old pandemic of racism collectively affect our nation's mental health and well-being. A report from the Kaiser Family Foundation in April found that nearly half of Americans reported that the coronavirus pandemic had a negative impact on their mental health. Read more.